Two-Way Radio Beginner’s Guide to walkie talkies

For years you’ve been seeing two-way radios¬†or as people like to call them walkie talkies everywhere you’ve gone. The usher in the movie theater was using them, the engineer at the hotel you stayed at, the security guard in the casino, the front desk supervisor at the office building, even the football coach in the game you were just watching, now it’s your turn at your job. Your organization has decided to make the jump from cellular to two-way radios and it’s your responsibility to set up the communications but you don’t have the slightest idea as to what would be best.

What is a two way radio? (Wikipedia)

A two-way radio is a radio that can do both transmit and receive a signal (a transceiver), unlike a broadcast receiver which only receives content. A two-way radio (transceiver) allows the operator to have a conversation with other similar radios operating on the same radio frequency (channel). Two-way radios are available in mobile, stationary base and hand-held portable configurations. Hand-held radios are often called walkie-talkies, handie-talkies, or just hand-helds.

Two-way radio systems usually operate in a half-duplex mode; that is, the operator can talk, or he can listen, but not at the same time. A push-to-talk or Press To Transmit button activates the transmitter; when it is released the receiver is active. A mobile phone or cellular telephone is an example of a two-way radio that can transmit and receive at the same time, i.e., in full-duplex mode. Full-duplex is generally achieved by the use of two different frequencies or by frequency-sharing methods to carry the two directions of the conversation simultaneously.[1] Methods for mitigating the self interference caused by simultaneous same-frequency transmission and reception include using two antennas,[2] or dynamic solid-state filters.

Normal specifications

High / Low Power Settings (4W/1W) Programmable Amateur Radio
Frequency Range: 65-108 MHz (Only commercial FM radio reception) VHF: 136-174 MHz(Rx/Tx). UHF: 400-520 MHz(Rx/Tx)
Customize Channel Names, the Boot Display and More by Using the PC03 FTDI Programming Cable
1500mAh Battery; Broadband (Wide) 25khz / Narrowband (Narrow) 12.5khz Selectable
AUTO Keypad Lock, Dual Band, Dual Display and Dual Standby

You can find some walkie talkie reviews here

Don’t be overwhelmed with the options available. Start by asking yourself the questions above. Below is a link to a radio selection guide that should also help you see what options are out there. Call your local radio dealer and they will help guide you through the process. Once you have your radios up and working you’ll wonder why you waited so long to switch.

These battery tips will help you obtain optimized performance and a longer life cycle from your Motorola rechargeable battery.

1. Charge your new battery overnight before using it. This is referred to as INITIALIZING and will enable you to obtain maximum battery capacity. a. Nickel Cadmium or Nickel Metal Hydride: 14-16 hours. b. Lithium Ion/Polymer: 1 to 2 additional hours after the charger light turns green.

2. New Motorola impres batteries, when inserted into a Motorola impres charger, will indicate a calibration cycle by displaying a steady Yellow indication on the charge status indicator. Allow this calibration process to complete by not removing the battery from the charger until it has completely charged and displays a steady green indication.

3. In order to minimize capacity loss and cycle life reduction, new, NON INITIALIZED batteries must be stored in well ventilated, cool and dry locations. Batteries stored in these conditions may be stored:

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